Telphone: +86 21 6859 7266
Language:中文 | English
News
News Content Your current location:Home >News> Content
Global Iron Ore:Vive La Différence!

    Citi’s third global iron ore report. We are downgrading our benchmark iron oreprice forecasts, forecasting a decline to an average of $80/t in 2020 before amodest rebound. We also introduce explicit forecasts for lumps, pellets, 58%, and65% ore, accompanied by granular examinations of these markets. For previous reports, see Strike while the iron is (still) hot? and Pumping Iron II.    Differentiation is becoming increasingly important as quality products command premiums representing a rising share of overall prices. While afore cast fall in iron ore prices is likely to see nominal premiums decline for many products, we expect significantly higher premiums on a percentage basis moving forward. This is being driven primarily by greater emphasis on pollution controls in China as well as declining domestic ore grades.    Chinese iron ore production is more resilient than commonly assumed. While Chinese mines are among the highest cost in the market, several factors are likely to support production even in the face of falling prices, including vertical integration(70% of output is owned by steel mills), freight advantages, and continued development of new mines.    Traditional cost curves present a misleading picture. While many companies publish cash cost figures, normalizing these for product and grade premiums,freight, moisture, and fx effects yields a very different picture. We currently see the top of the ex-China cost curve around $100/t on a benchmark equivalent basis, with an increasingly significant portion of supply in the $75-95/t range. We also evaluate the likelihood of project delays or cancellations, which we expect to play an important role in balancing the market in the medium term.    Chinese steel demand is slowing structurally, but even continued demand at2017’s level would be insufficient to absorb the current surge in supply.    Moreover, scrap supply is likely to increase rapidly as steel produced in the early2000s is recycled, reducing the share of steel production fed by iron ore. The government’s focus on local government debt and controlling credit is likely to slow demand but decisions around urbanization will still have a large impact on the path of demand.    Iron ore market participants would do well to heed the lessons of coal,aluminium and nickel. Prices will need to fall clearly below cash costs for aprolonged period to force production curtailments. This is especially true as iron ore lacks the potential to replicate the inventory financing seen for aluminium, though it should avoid the fate of met coal.